Why can 1930s semis only be homes or B&Bs?

Georgian and early Victorian streets look rigid and geometrical whereas suburban streets bend and sprawl. But the older flat fronted houses are used or converted in any number of ways, from Prime Minister’s residence, to offices, restaurants, to pubs and from pubs to houses, shops, the rag trade from sweatshops (traditionally in Spitalfields) to Savile Row …

North Korean Embassy in Gunnersbury Avenue, W5

North Korean Embassy in Gunnersbury Avenue, W5

Contrast the media’s amusement at finding that the North Korean embassy is housed in a semi in Ealing. This is because the point of suburban house design is to advertise that it’s residential — a refuge from the working world. So the only accepted commercial uses are quasi-homes, as in family hotels or B&Bs ( or, at a stretch, brothels.) It doesn’t even really feel comfortable when a restaurant is housed in a 1930s semi rather than a purpose built location in a shop parade: when I pass the Japanese restaurant in Hanger Lane, Ealing I do a double take. The most incongruous use of a semi was Crespigny Road, Hendon, during World War 2, as the place where double-agents misled the Germans via short-wave radio about the Allies war plans. But of course this traded on the very privacy that prevents semi detatched houses being accepted as the scene of public and civic life.

Momo restaurant, Hanger Lane, Ealing W5

Momo restaurant, Hanger Lane, Ealing W5

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